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  Indian J Med Microbiol
 

Figure 4: From left to right: examples of positron-emission tomography, computed tomography and positron-emission tomography/computed tomography, and the corresponding endoscopic appearance. (a) Deep ulcers with cobblestones in the left colon, appearing as a thickened segment with a prominent increase in[18] F-FDG uptake on positron-emission tomography/computed tomography and (b) no endoscopic lesion in the caecum, contrasting with the thickening of the bowel wall and increased uptake of FDG on positron-emission tomography/computed tomography. This research was originally published in JNM. Louis E, Ancion G, Colard A, Spote V, Belaiche J, Hustinx R. Noninvasive sssessment of Crohn's disease intestinal lesions with[19] F-FDG positron-emission tomography/computed tomography. J Nucl Med. 2007;48:1053–9.[11] © Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc

Figure 4: From left to right: examples of positron-emission tomography, computed tomography and positron-emission tomography/computed tomography, and the corresponding endoscopic appearance. (a) Deep ulcers with cobblestones in the left colon, appearing as a thickened segment with a prominent increase in<sup>[18]</sup> F-FDG uptake on positron-emission tomography/computed tomography and (b) no endoscopic lesion in the caecum, contrasting with the thickening of the bowel wall and increased uptake of FDG on positron-emission tomography/computed tomography. This research was originally published in JNM. Louis E, Ancion G, Colard A, Spote V, Belaiche J, Hustinx R. Noninvasive sssessment of Crohn's disease intestinal lesions with<sup>[19]</sup> F-FDG positron-emission tomography/computed tomography. J Nucl Med. 2007;48:1053–9.<sup>[11]</sup> © Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc